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Suds & Science

A “Spirited” Discussion




Sometimes, the most interesting discussions occur over a beer or a glass of your favorite vino. (Bonus points if you can remember what was said the next morning!) That’s the concept behind Suds & Science, a monthly event that brings scientists face-to-face with the general public in a neighborhood bar. Each session kicks off with a short and enlightening presentation, after which the floor is open for discussion between the audience and the speaker. We cover a wide variety of topics that can range from the science of beer to superhero physics to the genius of genomes. We invite you to come sit back, sip your favorite beverage and participate in the discussion. Suds & Science puts the fun and spirit(s) back into learning. 

 


Schedule 2021


January 11

7 to 8:30 p.m.

Topic: Are Students in their Element? Advancing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Chemistry Education

Science, and chemistry in particular, is happening all around us – impacting our daily lives in ever-increasing ways. Which is why it is important for higher education in science to help students understand how science and scientists work, so that they are able to judge the risks and benefits of scientific advances, that might affect their personal, professional or civic experiences. At the same time, to achieve scientific excellence and advancements in science that benefit all members of society, we need a strong diversity of thought and experience to be able to find unique solutions to the problems we, as a society, are facing. So how can we make the (chemical) sciences accessible, inclusive and relevant for all students? What evidence-based teaching strategies can we use to foster learner engagement, wonder, reflection, and ultimately, retention in the sciences? Stacey Brydges, a Teaching Professor and Vice-Chair of Equity Diversity, Inclusion and Climate in Chemistry and Biochemistry at UC San Diego, will discuss these and other questions related to recent research advances in chemistry teaching and learning in higher education.

Location: Virtual through zoom

Cost: $5-$20, The Fleet Science Center is happy to provide tiered pricing to make this event affordable, while also allowing attendees to support the Fleet if they can, making it possible for the Fleet to offer programs like these. 


 

February 8
7 to 8:30 p.m.

Topic: Autism Spectrum Disorders—it’s all About Genetics

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a pervasive group of neurodevelopmental disorders which its causes just recently started to get unraveled. There have been a lot of myths and misconceptions about the culprits behind this disorder, and the fact it is so heterogeneous in its manifestations helped to fuel all kind of theories. But thanks to advances in technology in the last decades, and the unrelenting effort of scientists, we can now say with a great degree of confidence that genetics is the likely cause for most of the cases. In this talk, Jorge Urresti aims to guide us through the history of the knowledge of ASD, and explain how the latest advances paint a clearer picture of its etiology. Jorge Urresti is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Psychiatry in the University of California, San Diego. He received his PhD in Molecular Biology in the Autonomous University of Barcelona. His research focuses on elucidating the functional impact of ASD mutations using patient-derived cells, and developing stem-cell applications for modeling neurodevelopmental disorders.

Location: Virtual through zoom

Cost: $5-$20, The Fleet Science Center is happy to provide tiered pricing to make this event affordable, while also allowing attendees to support the Fleet if they can, making it possible for the Fleet to offer programs like these. 


March 8
7 to 8:30 p.m.

Topic: From Black-Eyed Peas to Cancer Nanotechnology

We are living in a global pandemic and all of us are thinking about viruses. Pandemic or not, Dr. Steinmetz has viruses on her mind all the time… specifically plant viruses. To her, plant viruses are not pathogens or infectious agents – rather, Dr. Steinmetz sees plant viruses as ‘nanoscale’ tools that can be repurposed for applications targeting human health. While plant viruses can interact with cells in the human body, they cannot infect humans and the research in Dr. Steinmetz Lab sets out to engineer plant viruses to fight cancer, cardiovascular disease and lately also COVID-19. Learn more how her lab’s research has successfully treaded cancer in dogs, and what that might mean for humans.

Location: Virtual through zoom

Cost: $5-$20, The Fleet Science Center is happy to provide tiered pricing to make this event affordable, while also allowing attendees to support the Fleet if they can, making it possible for the Fleet to offer programs like these. 


April 12
7 to 8:30 p.m.

Topic: From Inventory to Blueprint—Determining the Functions of Essential Genes

Thanks to genome sequencing efforts from ~20 years ago, scientists have an inventory list of all the genes that are required to build an organism. Have you ever wondered how scientists figure out the function of those genes and convert inventory lists into models and blueprints? What does each gene do and how do gene products work together to build cells, tissues, and organisms? Dr. Rebecca Green has been working for the past 15 years to decipher the function of essential genes. Her work sits at the interface of systems biology, computational biology, genetics, and cell and developmental biology.  Rebecca Green, Ph.D. is a Visiting Scientist at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, and Bioinformatics Scientist at UC San Diego, where she spearheads an effort to functionally map essential developmental pathways using cutting-edge microscopy-based methods and the model organism C. elegans. Rebecca earned her Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis, was an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, and is the author of numerous top-tier scientific papers and book chapters. Green has explored different biological questions at small and large scales, using bacterial systems, model organisms and human cells throughout her scientific career. She has always been drawn to microscopy-based approaches to answer scientific questions because of its versatility, beauty, and the effectiveness of an image to communicate complex ideas. 

Location: Virtual through zoom

Cost: $5-$20, The Fleet Science Center is happy to provide tiered pricing to make this event affordable, while also allowing attendees to support the Fleet if they can, making it possible for the Fleet to offer programs like these. 


May 10
7 to 8:30 p.m.

Topic: Crossing Every Ocean For Science

Melissa Miller has traveled 150,000 miles on research vessels and spent more than 4 years of her life at sea while working at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Join us as she shares more about her, often isolated, life at sea, which used to be hard for her to explain, but we all know something about isolation these days. Melissa will share with us what her work at sea looks like and how her work helps scientists learn about how ocean temperatures, pH, and oxygen levels are changing and what that means for us all. The audience will also get to learn more about the instruments she uses to collect samples, which range from cutting-edge technology to some that have been used for centuries. She hasn't been replaced by a robot - yet. Melissa has crossed every ocean and been to the North Pole with scientists and crew members from countries all over the world, each trip is a unique experience. She also works as a science writer and is always looking for new topics to translate from scientific jargon into stories everyone can understand.

Location: Virtual through zoom

Cost: $5-$20, The Fleet Science Center is happy to provide tiered pricing to make this event affordable, while also allowing attendees to support the Fleet if they can, making it possible for the Fleet to offer programs like these. 


If you missed our special Suds & Science series: San Diego’s Amazing Race to Combat COVID-19, you can watch the these and other science talks on the Fleet Science Center's YouTube Channel.

Developing a Vaccine in Record Time - Dr. Francesca Torriani, Program director of Infection Prevention & Clinical Epidemiology at UC San Diego Health and Infectious Disease Specialist,  and Dr. Kate Broderick, VP of Preclinical Research & Development at Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. 

The Need for Speed in Finding Treatments - Dr. Evan Snyder, Dr. Sandra Leibel, Dr. Laura Riva and Dr. Xin Yin from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute 

Antibodies to the Rescue - Dr. Erica Ollmann Saphire from the La Jolla Institute for Immunology 

The Importance of Testing Everyone - Dr. Rob Knight, founding Director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation and Professor of Pediatrics, Bioengineering and Computer Science & Engineering at UC San Diego and co-founder of the American Gut Project and the Earth Microbiome Project, and Dr. Lauge Farnaes, physician in infectious diseases at Rady Children’s Hospital and Assistant Clinical Professor in Pediatrics at UC San Diego 


 

 

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